Archive for the ‘hifdh’ Tag

The Status of the Arabic Language in Islam

بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

Taken from www.abdurrahman.org.


The Status of the Arabic Language in Islâm

Shaykh Al-Islâm ibn Taymiyyah

Iqtidâ‘us-Sirâtil-Mustaqîm (2/207)

As for becoming accustomed to talking to one another in a language other than Arabic, which is the symbol of Islâm and the language of the Qur‘ân, so that this becomes a habit in the land, with one’s family and household members, with one’s friends, in the marketplace, when addressing government representatives or authority figures or when speaking to people of knowledge, undoubtedly this is makrooh (disliked), because it involves being like the non-Arabs, which is makrooh, as stated previously.

Hence when the early Muslims went to live in Syria and Egypt, where the people spoke Byzantine Greek, and in ’Iraaq and Khurasaan, where the people spoke Persian, and North Africa (al-Maghrib) where the people spoke Berber, they taught the people of those countries to speak Arabic, so that Arabic became the prevalent language in those lands, and! all the people, Muslim and kaafir alike, spoke Arabic. Such was also the case in Khurasaan in the past, then they became lax with regard to the language and got used to speaking Farsee until it became prevalent and Arabic was forgotten by most of them. Undoubtedly this is disliked.

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Methods of Memorization in Mauritania

بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

Mâ shâ’ Allâh, this is an excellent and detailed account of the renowned Mauritanian method of memorisation/hifdh.


Methods of Memorization in Mauritania

by: Abu Umar Abdul ‘Aziz

Al-Hamdu lillaah, we praise Allah and seek His aid and forgiveness. May the Salah and the Salam be upon the Messenger of Allah, and upon his family and companions and all who follow his path with goodness until the Day of Judgment.

To proceed:

Once, the great scholar and grammarian, Shaykh Muhammad Salim al-‘Udud ash-Shinqiti of Mauritania was attending a meeting for the international jurisprudence council in Cairo Egypt. After the meeting, the Shaykh went out with an Egyptian scholar to have dinner and converse with. During the course of the modest dinner, lively discussion took place about the various differences between Mauritania, a large extremely poor country situated in the Sahara desert, and the fairly developed and modern Egypt. The two scholars discussed the methods of Islamic study in both countries and this led the Egyptian scholar to jokingly ask him, “Which scholars are more knowledgeable, the scholars of Egypt or the scholars of Mauritania?”

In response to the question, Shaykh Muhammad Salim said: ” Your scholars are more knowledgeable in the day time, and our scholars are more knowledgeable in the night.”

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