Archive for the ‘arabic’ Tag

Arabic second-most common Australian tongue

Arabic second-most common Australian tongueAFP/File – Arabic is the most commonly spoken language after English by young people in Australia, a study has revealed, …
– Fri Apr 15, 12:09 pm ET

SYDNEY (AFP) – Arabic is the most commonly spoken language after English by young people in Australia, a study has revealed, with about one in eight multilingual children using it in the home.

The Australia Early Development Index, a government-backed study of more than 260,000 children in their first year of school, found that 18 percent spoke a language other than English.

Despite no Arabic nation making the top 15 countries of birth for Australia’s children, some 5,565 spoke the language at home, 11.8 percent of all multilingual children.

Vietnamese was the second-most prevalent, at 8.4 percent, followed by Greek, Chinese dialects and Hindi, each spoken by less than 5.0 percent

England, New Zealand, India and the United States were the top countries of birth after Australia, followed by the Philippines, China, South Africa, South Korea and Sri Lanka.

“The Australian population is one of the most culturally and linguistically diverse in the world and this is represented in the children surveyed for the AEDI,” the study said.

Aboriginal children made up 4.8 percent of the student population and one-fifth of them speak a native language in the home — most commonly a creole mixing an indigenous dialect with English.

Fewer than 100 children spoke any single local tongue, the study found.

Download `Arabiyyah Bayna Yadayk Books

بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

All three `Arabîyyah Bayna Yadayk books are now available for download and can be accessed in The Library or Course Material page.  Click here for a direct link.

Excellent Sarf Reference Book

بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

First of all, I apologise for the severe delay as I did aim to post this some months back.  Since then I’ve totally changed this ‘review’ and feel it’s about time I put it out…

Practicing sarf (morphology) is a very important aspect of learning Arabic that I’ve noticed many neglect early on.  It requires a degree of time, practice, memorisation and revision.  Alhamdulillâh, while for some I may have jumped the gun, one of my first and most important purchases when I took my Arabic studies seriously was a dictionary called, “A Dictionary of Arabic Verb Conjugation” (معجم تصريف الأفعال العربية) by Ambassador Antoine El-Dahdah and reviewed by Dr. Georges M. Abdul-Massih.  I now recommend this dictionary to pretty much everyone who is learning Arabic.

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Dealing with extremities [from Arabic Gems]

بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

This excellent article expounds on a concept in Arabic studies known as sîgh al-mubâlaghah ism fâ`il, the understanding of which is a must for the one who wishes to understand the names and attributes of Allâh.  May Allâh reward the sister who put this together, with good.

Dealing with extremities


al-Salāmu ‘alaykum wa rahmatullāh,

There are certain noun forms in Arabic known as siyagh al-mubaalaghah (‘forms of intensification/hyperbolic forms’) that are used to put across a more intense meaning than the original noun form. For example, a liar ‘kaadhib كاذب may also be known as akadhoob كذوب or a kadhdhaab كذّاب – all carrying the meaning of ‘liar’ but denoting different levels of intensity.

Allaah often uses these forms in the Qur’an, and thus we find that He refers to Himself as al-Ghaffaar الغفار (Ta-Ha verse 82) and al-Ghafoor الغفور (al-Burooj, verse 14).

Similarly, the slanderer has been referred to as a hammaaz هماز (al-Qalam, verse 11), and a humazah همزة (al-Humazah, verse 1).

Is there a difference between these forms of essentially the same word? Abu Hilal al-’Askari, author of al-Furooq al-Lughawiyyah, said that it is impossible for there to be two different words in Arabic that have exactly the same meaning, and that those who are unaware of the differences think that the different words are only different hyperbolic forms, whereas they also reflect different meanings.

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Arabiyyah Bayna Yadayk Book 3 Audios

بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

These are the last of the audio files for the Bayna Yadayk series.

Arabiyyah Bayna Yadayk Audios – Book 3 – Chapters 1-4

Arabiyyah Bayna Yadayk Audios – Book 3 – Chapters 5-8

Arabiyyah Bayna Yadayk Audios – Book 3 – Chapters 9-12

Arabiyyah Bayna Yadayk Audios – Book 3 – Chapters 13-16

Audios for book one: Arabiyyah Bayna Yadayk Book 1 Audios

Audios for book two: Arabiyyah Bayna Yadayk Book 2 Audios

English Translation of Al-Ajurrumiyyah

بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

Simplifying Al-Âjurrûmîyyah is basically an English translation of Al-Âjurrûmiyyah.  It should assist and play as a useful backup for those of us who may struggle with some words and phrases.  The translator is Abul-Layth Qasim ibn Aggrey Mutiva, may Allâh reward him with good.

Simplifying Al-Âjurrûmîyyah

More Lessons on Al-Ajurrumiyyah

بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

Shaykh Muhammad Al-Malikî (Jeddah, KSA) has taught Al-Âjurrûmiyyah in English.  There are around 100 lessons/files, with an additional number of revision and exam preparation lectures, which seem to be in Arabic.  Please mind the annoying adverts as the brother who uploaded this (may Allâh reward him and the Shaykh) is hosting his files at esnips.com.

Al-Âjurrûmiyyah English Durûs – Shaykh Al-Malikî